Hey Bec,
What can I do for my kids? I don't want them getting sick.

I have been asked this a lot the last few days, and really its a long answer so I will try to keep is simple.

  • Do your best to help them get plenty of sleep. I know this can be hard for some families as there are complex sleep issues in place.
    Let me know if you need more support in this area.

  • Be mindful of who they are visiting. Bless their cotton socks, we love them, but many that can be an infection control nightmare. They touch EVERYTHING.. 😄😄😄 So virus or cold or gastro or chicken pox, keep in mind where you are going and who you are visiting with a sick child. Can you get it delivered? Can you postpone the appointment? Hold off visiting people until they are well again

  • Vitamin D The article I have linked below is of a meta-analysis of Vitamin D use in the prevention of acute respiratory tract infections. The found Vitamin D supplementation was safe and it protected against acute respiratory tract infection overall. Patients who were very vitamin D deficient experienced the most benefit. So let the kids play in the early sun for 15 min and supplement with a great, tasty liquid drop or spray vitamin D. Vitamin D is also naturally high in Cod liver oil. So all those grandparents that tortured you when you were little were actually doing you a favour. 😄

  • Vitamin C This is like putting your immune system in a race car. It increases the white blood cell movement. Making them faster to respond to the virus and faster to attack it. There is are so many different delivery methods. Tablets, gummies (see point below), chewable tablets, drinks, fizzy tablets, powders, even oils... My preferred method is powder. You can get some great, potent, well thought out formulas that are tasty and you can control the dose. Talk to a professional to get the correct dose for your child. The one thing you need to watch is your bowel movements.. 💩💩 If your bowel movements become very soft or increase, you have hit your maximum level of vitamin C. For some this can have it's benefits.. 😄 But you will need to do is decrease the supplements dose. So watch your child if this happens.

  • Elderberry (Sambucus nigra) It a study published in 2019, they found Elderberry as a valualbe alternative to antibiotic misuse for upper respiratory symptoms, and a potentially safer alternative to prescription drugs for routine cases of the common cold and influenza.

  • Watch the supplement gummie trap This is great marketing. You feel like you are giving you kids a great supplement when often it is used incorrectly and is just and expensive lolly. It's physics. They can't put a lot of the active ingredient in these products because they will turn into a sticky mess. So you can use them, but be aware of how many you actually have to take to get a therapeutic affect and how that translates to sugar intake... tricky huh..

  • Probiotics For our really little bubs, if they are breastfed, Mum can dose up and this will help bub. If they are bottle fed, defiantly probiotics!
    Probiotics are great for daycare kids too!
    There is evidence of certain strains of probiotics. So turn the bottle around to all those crazy names on the back and read it. You are looking for Lactobacillus Reuteri (L.reuteri), Lactobacillus brevis (L.brevis), Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L.rhamnosus).

  • Teach them the ABC song to wash their hands It takes a bit of scrubbing to actually get your hands clean. If you teach them to sing the ABC song while they scrub their hands, and then rinse off you are making a BIG impact in their health. Something simple, fun, and cute that makes a big difference.

I hope that has given you some great areas to work on.
Remember our kids are resilient. They always seem to bounce back better and faster than us.

You got this 👍

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18512639
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25294223
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23794458
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28202713
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30670267
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27055821
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17397266